Skip to main content
Go Search
CFC Welcome
Afghanistan
Complex Coverage
Transboundary Issues
ASCOPE/PMESII
Comprehensive Approach
CFC Coverage Archive
  

 

 

       Contact us

 

       LinkedIn

 

     Facebook


The Afghanistan Team regularly populates this page with publications produced by institutions such as think tanks, international organisations, NGOs, Afghan government agencies and others. The documents are grouped by sector and are accompanied by summaries based on the abstract or executive summary of each report. If you feel that an additional report merits inclusion on this page, please send us an e-mail with, if possible, the document included as an attachment.   

>>> Contact us at Afghanistan@cimicweb.org.

                                 

HyperlinkFilterNotesFilter
Sector
Afghanistan Evaluation and Research Unit
06-MAR-13: Land, People, and the State in Afghanistan 2002-2012. This paper reviews the formal treatment of land rights in Afghanistan over the post-Bonn decade (2002 - 2012). The objective is to document the developments in the recent past to better understand present and possible future trends.
Governance
International Development Law Organization
12-JAN-12: Models, Strategies and Best Practices on Women’s Empowerment.The report says that all the barriers across the "justice chain" -legal, political, social, cultural and economic, whether in the formal or informal legal systems - need to be tackled to meet women's demands for justice.
Governance
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
14-JAN-12: The Resilient Oligopoly: A Political-Economy of Northern Afghanistan 2001 and Onwards. This paper studies the political and social dynamics of Northern Afghanistan - defined here as the five provinces of Faryab, Jowzjan, Sar-i Pul, Balkh, and Samangan - not just from the short-term perspective of political rivalry and personal competition, but also from the wider and longer-term perspective of the resilience and weaknesses of organisations, patronage networks, and institutions, by looking at the social and economic interests underpinning them. While much has been written about Northern Afghanistan, no overview of the Northern political landscape has been written previously and this paper is meant to fill the gap.
Governance; Economics
United States Institute of Peace
15-DEC-12: Political Economy and Conflict Dimensions of Afghanistan’s Mineral Resources: A Preliminary Exploration. Afghanistan has sizable underground mineral resources, which have potential positive eco­nomic impacts but also possible downsides—the so-called “resource curse” often involving negative macroeconomic, developmental, fiscal, governance, political and conflict effects.The way forward for these resources includes gradually improving and regularizing the frame­work; setting low royalty rates to encourage formalization of existing activities rather than leasing resources to outsiders; technical assistance to promote more effective extraction; and encouraging processing and value addition within Afghanistan.
Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); Policy Development and Evaluation Service (PDES)
11-DEC-12: Dangerous liaisons? A historical review of UNHCR’s engagement with non-state armed actors. This report reviews UNHCR’s history of engagement with NSAAs over the past 30 years, examining not only how and why such engagement has occurred, but also the ways in which it has been transformed. A secondary objective is to identify and anticipate the factors that explain why NSAAs are frequently identified as the pre-eminent challenge to contemporary humanitarianism.
Governance; Security
Global Information And Early Warning System On Food And Agriculture (GIEWS)
30-NOV-12: Country Brief: Afghanistan. This report provides a snapshot of wheat prices, levels of inflation and food security situation of 2012 in Afghanistan.
Governance; Security; Economics
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
27-NOV-12: Afghanistan Opium Survey 2012. This report reviews a series of statistical data between 19991 to 2012 on the evolution of opium cultivation in Afghanistan, including data such : Net opium poppy cultivation; Number of poppy-free provinces; Potential production of opium; Total farm-gate value of opium production and much more.
Governance
US Embassy
24-NOV-12: U.S. Embassy Kabul Gender Strategy. Continued progress on issues affecting women is fundamental to Afghanistan’s security, governance, and development through transition and beyond. This report, drafted with input from U.S. Embassy Kabul’s Interagency Gender Working Group (IGWG), serves as a basis for U.S. Embassy Kabul’s policy and programmatic engagement on gender issues. It also highlights the need to continue to mainstream gender issues into all policies and programs so that decreases in U.S. funding and presence in Afghanistan do not disproportionately affect women as transition proceeds. Implementation of this strategy will help to ensure the positive gains that have been achieved by women in Afghanistan become irreversible.
Governance
US Embassy in Kabul
18-NOV-12: US Embassy Kabul Gender Strategy. Continued progress on issues affecting women is fundamental to Afghanistan’s security, governance, and development through transition and beyond. This strategy, drafted with input from US Embassy Kabul’s Interagency Gender Working Group (IGWG), serves as a basis for US Embassy Kabul’s policy and  programmatic engagement on gender issues.
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
United States Institute of Peace
16-NOV-12: Peacebuilding Efforts of Women from Afghanistan and Iraq. This report is a compilation of lessons learned based on expert dialogue between Afghan and Iraqi women leaders in Istanbul, Turkey, in June 2012. Together, this diverse group of leaders mapped out practical steps for women in transitional countries and offered lessons learned from years of experience. These women also expressed their concerns about the negative trends they were seeing for women in North Africa. The dialogue has set in motion a process between Afghan and Iraqi women for developing lessons learned to share with women of the Arab Spring. The following report summarizes the key challenges, lessons learned, and best practices identified at the Istanbul dialogue in June 2012.
Governance; Security; Socio-cultural Development
Robert Muggah, Steven A. Zyck and Mark Downes
1-NOV-12:  Stability: International Journal of Security and Development. Volume 1, Issue 1. Robert Muggah, Steven A. Zyck and Mark Downes recently published a policy research working paper entitled ”Stability: International Journal of Security and Development”, which researches many issues as: the Development, Stabilization and Security Sector; Afghan National Army, Police and Other self-defence forces; Governance, Social and Economic Sector in Afghanistan. After a decade of fighting – starting with the relatively easy victory over the Taliban in 2001 and then featuring an increasingly tough counterinsurgency campaign against the reemergent Taliban – the growth of the Afghan security forces has become the lynchpin of the US and NATO strategy to achieve success in Afghanistan and extricate themselves from the Afghanistan war. At the end of 2014, NATO’s International Assistance Security Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan will hand over responsibility for Afghanistan’s security, economic development, and governance over to the Afghans.
 
Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure
Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction
30-OCT-12: Quarterly Report to the United States Congress. Military and political developments have dominated news from Afghanistan since SIGAR’s last report to Congress, with broad implications for the future of the U.S.-led reconstruction effort. The reporting quarter saw the end of the 30,000-strong American troop surge ordered in 2009, a rise in “insider” or “green-on-blue” attacks resulting in a temporary suspension of coalition training of Afghan security units, and the resumption of overland supply routes from Pakistan. The U.S. senior civilian and military leadership continued to develop plans to transfer reconstruction projects to the Afghan government. Meanwhile, the United States and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) posted new senior personnel to Afghanistan to represent their interests as the international community transitions responsibility to the Afghan government to secure the country and sustain economic development.
Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
Central Emergency Response Fund, United Nations
30-OCT-12: Quarterly Update: 3rd Quarter 2012. The Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) is a humanitarian fund established by the United Nations to enable more timely and reliable humanitarian response to those affected by natural disasters and armed conflicts. CERF has responded to the crisis with a total of US$30 million in 2012 – most recently with $16 million to FAO, UNICEF, UNRWA, UNHCR, WFP, UNFPA, IOM and WHO to enable a scaled-up response through provision of life-saving assistance in the areas of shelter, food, health, education, livelihoods, agriculture and water and sanitation. This report provides a quarterly overview of the income and expenditures of CERF till September2012.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics
Norwegian Peacebuilding Research Centre
29-OCT-12: Promoting women's rights in Afghanistan: a call for less aid and more politics. To NATO countries, promoting women’s rights in Afghanistan is often framed as a choice between committing to high levels of aid for gender-related activities and an uncompromising public stance vis-à-vis the Afghan authorities, or a realisation that women’s rights is an internal issue where outsiders can achieve little. Both these options are based on misguided assumptions. Attempting to “fast-track” Afghan women’s rights in isolation from local politics will fail. But neither is it correct to assume that Western actions can have no impact.
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
AFPPD - ICRW - Australian Aid - UNFPA
29-OCT-12: Child Marriage in Southern Asia: Policy Options for Action. The overall purpose of this report is to highlight the seriousness of the life threatening situation that girls often face on account of child marriages in nine Southern Asian countries, and to recommend ways in which policymakers can take renewed action as a means to preventing the practice.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Socio-cultural Development
Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan
28-OCT-12: Mine Action Programme of Afghanistan: August/September 2012 Newsletter. Thirty-one Police-e-Mardumi (community police) and six Ministry of Education’s Child Protection Officers (CPOs) were trained to deliver Mine/explosive remnants of war risk education (M/ERE) in affected communities in the provinces of Balkh and Kunduz between August and September.This report talks about the project of the Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan (MACCA) and United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS), implemented in coordination with the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) and the European Union Police Mission (EUPOL).
Governance; Security; Infrastructure
Norwegian Refugee Council and Humanitarian Policy Group
27-OCT-12: Supporting Principled Humanitarian Action. This report presents the findings and analysis of case studies conducted in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Pakistan and South Sudan with support from the Overseas Development Institute’s Humanitarian Policy Group. Other elements of the project include developing decision-making guidance for practitioners, seeking concurrence on what constitutes principled humanitarian funding and holding a high-level conference in Brussels on 4 December 2012.

 
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance
Afghanistan Re-search and Evaluation Unit (AREU)
27-OCT-12: Land Governance at the Crossroads: A Review of Afghanistan’s Proposed New Land Management Law. This is the first of several related briefing papers by the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit, each considering a single issue affecting land and property relations in Afghanistan. This paper critiques proposed changes to the Land Management Law 2008 that were compiled until early this year. The Afghanistan Land Authority (ARAZI) is now conducting public consultations and many more changes are expected. This report is designed to constructively contribute to this process and the wider debate on land governance in Afghanistan.
Governance
Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Centre (NOREF)
26-OCT-12: Gender, Fragility and the Politics of Statebuilding. This report examines how the international community can better integrate gender into its statebuilding support. In particular, it focuses on how international actors can promote the participation of women in the core politics of statebuilding, i.e. the negotiation of the political settlement, democratisation processes, the development of civil society’s voice and engagement with informal power.
Governance; Economics; Infrastructure
Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET)
26-OCT-12: Afghanistan Food Security Outlook: October 2012 to March 2013. This report outcomes over a six-month period, FEWS NET develops a set of assumptions about likely events, their effects, and the probable responses of various actors. FEWS NET analyzes those assumptions in the context of current conditions and local livelihoods to develop scenarios estimating food security outcomes.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance
House of Commons International Development Committee
25-OCT-12: Afghanistan: Development progress and prospects after 2014. The UK Government’s overarching strategy for its engagement in Afghanistan has given DFID the lead in creating a viable state. DFID has had some successes, for example in increasing tax revenue, but these gains will be difficult to sustain and further progress will not be made unless the Afghan Government is determined to achieve a similar outcome. This committee report recommends that the UK Government reconsider DFID’s focus on creating a ‘viable state’, giving greater emphasis to the provision of services and alleviating poverty.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
Centre for Global Development
25-OCT-12: Economic Assistance in Conflict Zones- Lessons from Afghanistan. This report examines through the lens of foreign-assistance policy the following questions: “Has the international community been able to lay the foundations for a stable Afghanistan? Is the Afghan government now capable of formulating and implementing economic and security policies widely perceived as welfare enhancing? Or will the country collapse into anarchy as Taliban and anti-Taliban forces struggle for power in the wake of the coming security vacuum?”

 
Governance; Security; Economics
Free & Fair Election Foundation of Afghanistan
24-OCT-12: Six-month Parliamentary Observation Report. This publication is meant to capture and simply summarize the work of Wolesi Jirga over the first eight months of 2012 in such a way that it informs the citizens, civil society representatives, experts but even the MPs and the administration of Wolesi Jirga. This high institution is a complex mechanism for most citizens to understand and there are many internal mechanisms that work on many different issues of the country. As some citizens have indicated to FEFA, people need more information on their representative institution and to simplify its proceedings for common understanding. This report provides an overview of attendance by lawmakers and of the number of laws discussed and approved.
Governance
Human Rights Research and Advocacy Consortium; Oxfam Novib
22-OCT-12: Women's Participation in Peace Process and Negotiation Table. This report examines the role of women in the Afghan peace process. Even though women constitute 50% of the Afghan population, they are beign systematically marginalized from the peace process playing only a symbolic role. This dynamic is at odds with the expectations and desires of 95.7% of the Afghan public who considers that the participation of women is necessary. What is more concerning, is the fact that there are indications that the Afghan government is willing to compromise women's rights as an incentive for opposition groups to enter into peace negotiations.
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
World Food Programme (WFP)
19-OCT-12: Afghanistan Market Price Bulletin: October 2012. The World Food Programme  (WFP) released the Afghanistan Market Price Bulletin for covering the month of October. The report reviews the process of average wheat grain retail prices. On the international market, a decreasing trend of wheat price was continuously observed during October 2011 and May 2012, but has been increasing from June through October 2012. The sharp increase of wheat grain in international markets (June-August 2012) is slightly transmitted to the Afghan market. Following the Wheat grain price trend, Wheat flour average price was also on decreasing since July 2011 till May 2012 while the price increased in the months of June - October 2012 in the main urban cities of Afghanistan.
Governance; Economics
European Commission, Directorate General for Humanitarian Aid
18-OCT-12: Humanitarian Implementation Plan South Asia 2013. This report review a  series of programme planning and implementation priorities under the Seventh DIPECHO Action Plan for South Asia a to be considered eligible for funding for countries as:  Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Economics
Country Indicators for Foreign Policy (CIFP); Carleton University; Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA)
17-OCT-12: Islamic Republic of Afghanistan: A Risk Assessment Report. Carleton University released  a publication about Afghanistan which  reviews a range of issues such as History of Armed Conflict, Governance and Political Instability, Militarization, Population Heterogenity, Demographic Stess, Economic Performance, Human Development, Environmental Stress, International Stakeholdet Impact and Possibile Scenarios.
Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure
Assessment Capacity Project
10-OCT-12: Disaster Needs Analysis: Afghanistan. Insecurity and armed conflict continue to affect a large part of Afghanistan, leading to significant protection concerns, large scale displacement and a lack of humanitarian access. This report offer a general overview about humanitarian, displacement, country and demographic profile; health, nutrition and water source data; also various post 2014 scenarios regarding economy violence and refugees;
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
International Crisis Group
08-OCT-2012: Afghanistan: The Long, Hard Road To The 2014 Transition Asia Report N°236; International Crisis Group. Plagued by factionalism and corruption, Afghanistan is far from ready to assume responsibility for security when U.S. and NATO forces withdraw in 2014. That makes the political challenge of organising a credible presidential election and transfer of power from President Karzai to a successor that year all the more daunting. A repeat of previous elections’ chaos and chicanery would trigger a constitutional crisis, lessening chances the present political dispensation can survive the transition. In the current environment, prospects for clean elections and a smooth transition are slim. The electoral process is mired in bureaucratic confusion, institutional duplication and political machinations. Electoral officials indicate that security and financial concerns will force the 2013 provincial council polls to 2014. There are alarming signs Karzai hopes to stack the deck for a favoured proxy. Demonstrating at least will to ensure clean elections could forge a degree of national consensus and boost popular confidence, but steps toward a stable transition must begin now to prevent a precipitous slide toward state collapse. Time is running out.
Governance; Security
United States Agency for International Development

30-SEP-12: Afghanistan Complex Crisis: Fact Sheet #4. Since 2002, frequent natural disasters and conflict have displaced populations and generated significant humanitarian needs throughout Afghanistan. Recurring natural disasters in Afghanistan, including drought, floods, landslides, earthquakes, and avalanches, affect an average of 400,000 Afghans each year, according to OCHA. This report includes USAID/OFDA response efforts in Afghanistan: supporting rapid response capacity for acute needs following natural disasters and conflict, humanitarian indicators and building household economic resilience, and enhancing humanitarian coordination, data collection, and analysis.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security
World Bank
25-SEP-12: Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund: SY1391 first quarterly report (20 March 2012 - 20 June 2012). The first section of this report provides an update on the ARTF's financial activities during the first quarter of SY1391. This section also includes an update on new approvals, the Incentive Program and the ARTF external review. As per the financing strategy for SY1391-1393, the ceiling for recurrent cost financing in SY1391 was set at USD 225 million, including USD 175 million in recurrent cost base financing and USD 50 million for the Incentive Program (IP). Based on a request from the Ministry of Finance the full baseline financing of USD 175 million was transferred already in the first quarter of SY1391. These funds are yet to be disbursed. The IP funds will be released when benchmarks agreed under the new IP have been met.
Governance; Economics
PONARS Eurasia
25-SEP-12: Drug Trafficking in Central Asia: A poorly considered fight? This memo addresses three factors to help explain the uninspired start of the fight against drug trafficking in Central Asia. The first is an erroneous  conflation of Islamic insurgency with drug-fueled shadow economies that primarily serve the interests of the ruling elites. Second is the implicit assumption that physical border checkpoints between Central Asia and Afghanistan can resolve the drug trade in the absence of a political will to fight corruption. The third is an excessive focus on security as opposed to demand reduction and treatment.
Governance; Security
World Bank
24-SEP-12: The Employment Challenge in South Asia’s Conflict Zones. South Asia has experienced high levels of conflict over the past decade. More than 58,000 people were killed in armed conflict worldwide in 2009; at least a third of them were in South Asia. Ongoing conflicts in the region include the conflicts in Afghanistan and Pakistan, insurgent movements in India’s northeastern regions, and the violent activities of left-leaning groups in the eastern and central parts of India. This report examine the key challenges to job creation in conflict-affected environments, using household and firm level surveys from South Asian countries.
Governance; Security; Economics
Center for Strategic & International Studies
21-SEP-12: Six Conditions for an Effective Transfer of Power in Afghanistan. This report refers to the transition of power in Afghanistan based on analytic details by Burke Chair studies and reports.
Governance; Security
ActionAid, IDS, Womankind Worldwide
20-SEP-12: From the Ground Up: Women's Role in Local Peacbuilding in Afghanistan, Liberia, Nepal, Pakistan and Sierra Leone. A new report from ActionAid, IDS, and Womankind looks at the role of women in local peacebuilding initiatives, finding that women are more likely than men to adopt a broad definition of peace which includes the household level and focuses on the attainment of individual rights and freedoms such as education, healthcare and freedom from violence. In contrast, men have a greater tendency to associate peace with the absence of formal conflict and the stability of formal structures such as governance and infrastructure. The research has revealed that women face multiple barriers as they attempt to build peace in their communities
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
United States Institute of Peace
19-SEP-12: Providing Space for Positive Youth Engagement. Afghanistan’s youth bulge, estimated at 21 million people under 25 years old, are a potential catalyst for shifting the current political and conflict dynamics in Afghanistan. Donor governments seeking positive change in Afghanistan can approach those under the age of 30 as the most likely source of such change. Young Afghan advocates need support from the international community to ensure that they have the requisite space and skills to meaningfully participate in future electoral processes and in local and national peace negotiations or reintegration programs.
Governance; Economics; Socio-cultural Development
RAND
18-SEP-12: Historical Lessons for Creating Local Defense Forces for Afghanistan and Beyond. Local defense forces have played a key role in counterinsurgencies throughout the 20th century. With the recent development of the Afghan Local Police (ALP) as a major part of the U.S.-led counterinsurgency campaign in Afghanistan, lessons learned from earlier efforts to build local defense have become increasingly salient. This study examines eight cases of local defense forces used in the context of counterinsurgency in Indochina, Algeria, South Vietnam, Oman, El Salvador, Southern Lebanon, Afghanistan, and Iraq. The authors compare the lessons learned from these eight cases and apply them to the current development of the ALP, in order to outline potential challenges and to suggest a way forward that takes into account the historical experience.
Governance; Security
Government of the United Kingdom
19-SEP-12: Afghanistan Monthly Progress Report July and August 2012. The UK Government has committed itself to keeping Parliament informed about developments in Afghanistan on a monthly basis. This twentieth report covers progress in July and August 2012. It reflects the combined assessment of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, the Ministry of Defence and the Department for International Development.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
United States Institute of Peace
18-SEP-12: The US Surge and Afghan Local Governance. This report focuses on both the U.S. military’s localized governance, reconstruction, and development projects and U.S. civilian stabilization programming in Afghanistan from 2009 through 2012. Based on interviews with nearly sixty Afghan and international respondents in Kabul, Kandahar, Nangarhar, and Washington, this report finds that the surge has not met its transformative objectives due to three U.S. assumptions that proved unrealistic. It also examines lessons from the U.S. surge’s impacts on local governance that can be applied toward Afghanistan’s upcoming transition.
Governance
United States Institute of Peace
17-SEP-12: Lessons from Afghanistan's History for the Current Transition and Beyond. Despite interesting patterns from the past and at least superficially striking parallels with the present, policies on Afghanistan have not been adequately informed by an understanding of the country’s history. Nor has the extensive academic literature on Afghan history been translated into policy; on the contrary, much that has been attempted in Afghanistan since late 2001 has been remarkably ahistorical. This report identifies broad historical patterns and distills relevant lessons that may be applicable to policies during the 2011 to 2014 transition and beyond. Responsibility for the views expressed and any errors is solely the author’s.
Governance
European Commission Humanitarian Department
13-SEP-12: Humanitarian Implementation Plan: Pakistan. Humanitarian challenges from both natural and man-made crises continue to confront Pakistan. Approximately 18 million people were affected by the 2010 floods. In addition, at least 5.8 million people have been affected by floods in 2011. The complex crisis caused by conflict continues to generate needs for protection and assistance, and to produce displacement of civilians.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Economics
Royal United Services Institute
10-SEP-12: Taliban Perspectives on Reconciliation. Taliban Perspectives on Reconciliation presents interviews with four senior Taliban interlocutors about their approach to reconciliation and reveals the so-called Quetta Shura Taliban (QST), led by Mullah Mohammed Omar, will not accept the interpretation of the Afghan constitution in its current form - widely seen as informing the political authority of the Karzai regime - since it would be akin to surrender.
Governance; Security; Socio-cultural Development
Open Society Foundations
06-SEP-12: Remaking Bagram: The Creation of an Afghan Internment Regime and the Divide over U.S. Detention Power. September 9, 2012 should mark the end of a six-month transition process, in which thousands of detainees are transferred from the U.S. military to the Afghan government and the Afghan government takes control of the Detention Facility in Parwan (DFIP). Many Afghans saw this transfer as a restoration of Afghan sovereignty over detentions.  However, Open Society Foundations research suggests that the detention agreement struck between the Afghan and U.S. governments in March 2012 masks a difference in understanding. While the Afghan overnment maintains that under this agreement U.S. detentions will end as of September 9, 2012, the United States wants to retain control over part of the detention facility, the DFIP, so that it can continue to capture, hold, and perhaps detain individuals there for the foreseeable future.
Governance; Security
Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Centre
30-AUG-12: Towards 2014 and beyond: NATO, Afghanistan and the “Heart of Asia. This report forms part of a series of papers produced by the Norwegian Experts Group on Afghanistan and Pakistan (NEGAP), an initiative undertaken by NOREF. The project analyses the crisis and conflict in these two countries over the past decade, focusing particularly on the Norwegian experience.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security
Center for American Progress
17-AUG-12: Outlining a diplomatic strategy for Afghanistan's political transition. Since 2009 the Obama administration has renewed efforts to stabilize Afghanistan
and dealt major blows to Al Qaeda and its affiliates around the world. As the United States and other international partners realign their commitments in Afghanistan in the coming years to meet broader global priorities, responsibility for securing the country’s future will shift to Afghan leaders. The year 2014 will be critical for this transition as that is the year that Afghan forces are set to assume full control of their nation’s security and the scheduled presidential election will produce the first Afghan government since 2001 not led by President Hamid Karzai.
Governance
World Bank
16-AUG-12: Understanding the Businss Environment in South Asia: Evidence from a Firm-Level Analysis. This paper examines the relationship between firm performance and growth and the business environment in the countries of the South Asia Region, including Afghanistan, using firm-level data from the World Bank’s Enterprise Surveys. For Afghanistan, political instability is the top-ranked constraint to enterprises, followed by electricity, corruption and access to land. Problems with business licensing, access to skilled labor and labor regulation come at the bottom and are not considered to comprise the most important current challenges.
Governance; Economics; Socio-cultural Development
The Combating Terrorism Center at West Point
16-AUG-12: Beware of Imitators: Al-Qa`ida through the Lens of its Confidential Secretary.  "I should write a history of the jihadis in my time as I witnessed it and not as it is perceived by the West or those who disagree with us,” explains Fadil Harun regarding his motivation to publish his two-volume manuscript al-Harb `ala al-Islam: Qissat Fadil Harun (The War against Islam: the Story of Fadil Harun). The spirit driving Harun’s manuscript is to produce a corrective history of al-Qa`ida distinguishing it from jihadi groups acting in its name. He believed that unlike al-Qa`ida, many jihadi groups have deviated from the true path of jihad: they lack a sound ideological worldview and many of their operations, particularly those which involved resorting to “tatarrus” (i.e., the use of non-combatants as human shields), are in breach of what he deems to be “lawful jihad.” This report is a study of al-Qa`ida’s ideology, organizational structure, strengths and weaknesses through Harun’s lens and in light of captured battlefield documents.
Governance; Security; Socio-cultural Development
Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Centre
15-AUG-12: A slightly different approach: Norwegian non-military collaboration with Afghanistan. Norway has a long history of providing humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan through non-governmental organisations and the United Nations, and has played an active role in aiding the rebuilding and development of the country since the fall of the Taliban in 2001. The Norwegian approach has tried to balance support for military and civilian efforts, fully engage with the Government of Afghanistan (GoA) and at the same time help protect the humanitarian space. Norway has been loyal to the development strategies and priorities agreed upon among the GoA, donors and international organisations. It has promised to continue its development collaboration with Afghanistan beyond 2014 when the military engagement is to end. However, the form and extent of this collaboration is likely to depend on developments in Afghanistan over the coming years – and not least on the ability of the GoA to handle and implement development projects in a transparent and corruption-free manner.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance
The Brookings Institution
31-JUL-12: Afghanistan Index. The Afghanistan Index is a statistical compilation of economic, public opinion and security data. This resource provides updated and historical information on various data, including crime, infrastructure, casualties, unemployment, Afghan security forces and coalition troop strength. The index is designed to assemble the best possible quantitative indicators of the international community’s counterinsurgency and nation-building efforts in Afghanistan, to track them over time, and to offer an objective set of criteria for benchmarking performance.
Governance; Security; Economics
SIGAR
30-JUL-12: Quarterly Report to Congress, US Special Insepctor General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR). This report notes that The scheduled end of the US combat presence in 2014, the handover of security functions to the Afghan government, fiscal constraints facing donor countries and the persistence of the Taliban and other armed factions—all increase the pressure to complete vital projects, stand up viable institutions, and otherwise help the Afghan government move toward sustainable self-reliance. The report itself notes that a large volume of US spending in Afghanistan will not prove sustainable and that security costs for reconstruction activities are likely to increase in the future, thus limiting the amount of funds actually dedicated to social and economic uplift.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
Office of President of Afghanistan, Afghan Mission to the UN
29-JUL-12: Presidential Decree on Administrative Reform. Afghan President Hamed Karzai’s recent executive decree focussing on (but not only) the fight against corruption, which partly came as a reaction to debates at the recent international Afghanistan conference in Tokyo, sparked mixed reactions from Afghan parliamentarians, activists, experts and people at large. This is an official translation of the Decree provided by the Permanent Mission of Afghanistan to the United Nations in New York.
Governance
United States Institute of Peace
27-JUL-12: Mutual Accountability: Lessons and Prospects for Afghanistan Post-Tokyo. This paper first reviewssome lessons from international experience with conditionality associated with policy-based financial support to developing countries. It then looks at experience with mutual accountability efforts in Afghanistan over the past decade, focusing on the Bonn Agreement of December 2001, the Afghanistan Compact of early 2006, and budget support operations and the Incentive Program of the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund. Finally, the paper also discusses prospects with respect to implementing the Tokyo framework.
Governance
Afghanistan Research And Evalution Unit
16-JUL-12: Fixing Afghanistan's Electoral System: Arguments and Options for Reform. Following Afghanistan’s deeply flawed parliamentary election in 2010, calls for electoral reform among both national and international actors have been steadily gaining momentum. One major focus of criticism has been the country’s use of the single non-transferable vote (SNTV) system, which many argue must be scrapped or overhauled before the next set of legislative elections in 2015. International election experts Andrew Reynolds and John Carey explore how and why SNTV has left Afghanistan with a weak legislature, unable to advance coherent national policy programmes to deal with the country’s significant challenges.
Governance
Afghanistan Analysts Network
07-JUL-12: Snapshots of an Intervention: The Unlearned Lessons of Afghanistan's Decade of Assistance (2001-2011). The contributions present a rare and detailed insight into the complexity of the intervention in Afghanistan – including the often complicated relations between donors and representatives of the Afghan government (with projects tending to be nominally Afghan-led, but clearly donor-driven), the difficulties in achieving greater coherence and leverage and, in many cases, the widely shared failure to learn the necessary lessons and to adapt to realities as they were encountered.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
CARE International
06-JUL-12: Women and Transition in Afghanistan. As the security situation worsens in Afghanistan, precious gains made by women and girls over the past decade in claiming their rights and access to services such as health and education are in jeopardy. High levels of gender-based violence continue, including forced early marriage and domestic abuse, and almost complete impunity for crimes against women and girls. The withdrawal of international forces, handover of security responsibilities to Afghan forces, and manoeuvring of power-holders ahead of presidential elections in 2014 generate further uncertainty. Aid agency staff and the communities we work with fear that increasing and new forms of conflict and instability will emerge.
Governance; Security; Socio-cultural Development
CSO; UNICEF
27-JUN-12: Afghanistan Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey. The Afghanistan Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey is a nationally representative sample survey that presents data on the social, health, and educational status of women and children in Afghanistan. It was conducted in 2010-2011 by the Afghan Central Statistics Organisation, with the technical and financial support of UNICEF. The survey is based on the need to monitor progress towards goals and targets emanating from recent international agreements such as the Millennium Declaration and the Plan of Action of A World Fit For Children. It further helps track progress towards the Afghan Government’s policy commitments to reduce poverty and support the wellbeing of women and children.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
19-JUN-12: Mind the Gap? Local practics and institutional reforms for water allocation in Afghanistan's Panj-Amu river basin. Since 2004, policymakers and international donor agencies have been trying to introduce “good” water governance concepts in the reform of Afghanistan’s water sector, including integrated water resource management, river basin management and participation in decentralised decision-making via Multi-Stakeholder Platforms. Starting in 2005, the Panj-Amu River Basin Program has been piloting the introduction of these imported concepts in north-eastern Afghanistan. With this context in mind, this paper draws on research carried out in two areas of the Panj-Amu Basin—the Taloqan Sub-basin and Lower-Kunduz Sub-basin—during the dry year of 2011. In doing so, it attempts to provide a better understanding of how local institutions currently deal with water allocation at the sub-basin level in times of drought, and discuss further policy challenges and opportunities.
Governance; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
United States Institute of Peace
19-JUN-12: Learning from Women's Success in the 2010 Afghan Elections. This report, sponsored by the Center for Gender and Peacebuilding at the U.S. Institute of Peace, is based on data culled from the 2010 parliamentary elections in Afghanistan.  Using these numbers, the authors assess how female candidates and voters fared in the last election and provide recommendations for improving women's participation in future Afghan elections.
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
Center for Strategic and International Studies
19-JUN-12: Afghanistan from 2012-2014: Is a Successful Transition Possible? A modest form of strategic success in Afghanistan is still possible, but it is too soon to know whether it is probable. The Afghan government, the US and its allies, and aid donors have not made enough collective progress to assign a clear level of probability. Moreover, it is too soon to know what level of forces they will maintain in Afghanistan through the end of 2014 and beyond, what levels of military and civil aid they will provide, and what level of success Afghanistan can achieve moving forward. If they are to succeed, major improvements must take place in the depth and quality of planning and analysis, as well as in the transparency, credibility, and integrity of reporting within the US government, allied government, ISAF, and international institutions.
Governance; Security; Economics
Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
06-JUN-12: OCHA Annual Report 2011. 2011 was an important year for the humanitarian community and for OCHA. At the end of December, humanitarian response partners, UN agencies, NGOs and the International Red Cross/Red Crescent Movement agreed on a series of reforms that focused on making their response efforts faster and more effective. Many of OCHA's traditional donor countries were affected by the global economic crisis. Political protests evolved into a year-long, region-wide series of uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East, with significant humanitarian consequences in Libya, Yemen and Syria. And persistent conflict continued in Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Afghanistan and elsewhere, affecting millions of people. This report shows how OCHA responded to these significant challenges.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
Afghanistan Analysts Network
16-MAY-12: Beating a Retreat: Propsects for the Transition Process in Afghanistan. In the report Barbara Stapleton, a former Senior Political Advisor to the Special Representative of the EU for Afghanistan, describes how the international intervention in Afghanistan has veered from ‘too little too late’ in its crucial early years, to one of ‘too much too late’. And now, as the US and its allies in NATO are getting ready for withdrawal, concerns are mounting over the formidable challenges that are facing the transition and whether it will succeed in delivering its objective: a self-sustaining Afghan state. The report, based on extensive interviews with those directly involved in the transition strategy – both on the side of the decision-makers and within Afghan civil society where the consequences of the transition will be felt most directly – raises critical questions and argues that a hasty implementation without the necessary conditions in place increases the risk of the Afghan state’s collapse and with it, the prospect of strategic failure for NATO. According to Stapleton: ‘In the rush to get out of the quagmire that Afghanistan has become, the US and other NATO member states may well be preparing the ground for more instability, rather than less.’
Governance; Security
World Bank
10-MAY-12: Afghanistan in Transition: Looking Beyond 2014. Afghanistan has experienced some major development achievements in the course of the past 11 years. GDP growth has been high, albeit heavily dependent on foreign aid and security spending and closely tied with trends in the country's domestic agriculture sector. While aid has driven GDP growth -- with USD 15.7 billion in aid having been given to the country in 2010 alone -- it has also left the country vulnerable. A decline in foreign aid will effect the country's economy, particularly in cities and in insecure provinces which have received the bulk of foreign spending. Unemployment is anticipated to rise as the cuts proceed in the years up to and after 2014. GDP growth may be as high as 7% in the coming years, though experts indicate that projectionsin the 5-6% range appear more likely. Such projections assume that large-scale mining operations at Hajigak (iron) and Aynak (copper) move forward and that the security situation does not further deteriorate.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
Save the Children
09-MAY-12: State of the World's Mothers 2012. This report contains an annual ranking of the best and worst places in the world for mothers and children. Save the Children count on the world's leaders to take stock of how mothers and children are faring in every country and to respond to the urgent needs described in this report. Investing in this most basic partnership of all -- between a mother and her child -- is the first and best step in ensuring healthy children, prosperous families and strong communities.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Socio-cultural Development
Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock
09-MAY-12: Implementing the SME Strategy: Action Plan for Developing Afghanistan's Agri-Business Sector (May 2012-April 2013). The Government of Afghanistan’s SME Strategy was finalised in December 2009. The Strategy aims to encourage pro-poor growth by creating jobs in rural areas which have largely missed out on the booming economy which has long characterised Afghanistan’s major cities.
Governance; Economics; Infrastructure
Ministry of Counter-Narcotics, UNODC
07-MAY-12: Periodical Report on Poppy Eradication, Verification in Afghanistan. The Government's National Drugs Control Strategy calls for targeted eradication in areas where it is assessed that opportunities for alternative livelihoods  exist.  The assessment is made against a range of socio-economic indicators based on a wide range of data-sets. Governors have been requested to carry out eradication within target zones demarcated by Planning Cell of MCN.
Governance; Security; Economics
UNHCR
03-MAY-12: Joint Communique of the International Conference on the Solutions Strategy for Afghan Refugees to Support Volunary Repatriation, Sustainable Reintegration and Assistance to Host Countries. The Islamic Republic of Iran and the Islamic Republic of Pakistan have hosted millions of Afghan refugees for more than three decades. During the last 10 years, over 5.7 million Afghan refugees have returned to Afghanistan, constituting nearly a quarter of the current Afghan population. There are still approximately three million registered Afghan refugees in neighboring Pakistan (nearly two million) and Iran (nearly one million), making this one of the largest protracted refugee situations in the world. This situation requires continued efforts to facilitate voluntary repatriation and support to reintegration in Afghanistan.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance
Central Statistics Organization; United Nations Population Fund
02-MAY-12: Bamyan Socio-Demographic and Economic Survey. With the unavailability of up-to-date data presenting difficulties to both  local and national leadership, several agencies, institutions and organizations tried to collect the data on their own, which created problems on the consistency of values due to differences in methodology and concepts. To  resolve the confusion and  address the vacuum of vital data,  CSO conceptualized  the SocioDemographic and Economic Survey (SDES) in  2011, with the intent of  conducting it  province by
province, as the Expert Group had recommended, with an emphasis on  collecting the sociodemographic and economic data  at the district level.  In light of its  secure environment,  Bamiyan
became the first province to conduct the survey.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
Government of the United States of America, Government of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan
01-MAY-12: Enduring Strategic Partnership Agreement Between the United States of America and the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. "Emphasizing their shared determination to further advance the Afghan people's desire for a stable and independent Afghan state, governed on the basis of Afghanistan's Constitution and shared democratic values, including respect for the fundamental rights and freedoms of all men and women, Afghanistan and the United States ("the Parties") commit to strengthen long-term strategic cooperation in areas of mutual interest, including: advancing peace, security, and reconciliation; strengthening state institutions; supporting Afghanistan's long-term economic and social development; and encouraging regional cooperation."
Governance
UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office
30-APR-12: Human Rights and Democracy: The 2011 Foreign & Commonwealth Office Report. Human rights remain high on the agenda in Afghanistan, particularly in the context of protecting progress made by the Afghan government.  Whilst the Afghan government’s National Priority Programme (NPP) on human rights and civic responsibilities was endorsed
by the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board – a body which is chaired by the United Nations and the Afghan government and is responsible for monitoring progress on development priorities – more work needs to be done by the Afghan government across the board to implement its human rights obligations. 
Governance
The Century Foundation
19-APR-12: Achieving U.S. Objectives in Afghanistan: Talking, Fighting, or Something in Between? The Century Foundation and the Center for American Progress hosted a discussion on issues related to the U.S. strategy in Afghanistan and Pakistan on Tuesday, April 19.  The first panel focused on U.S. counterinsurgency efforts in Afghanistan. The second explored the viability of a negotiated political settlement in Afghanistan.
Governance; Security; Economics
Afghanistan Analysts Network
18-APR-12: Legal Aid in Afghanistan; Context, Challenges and the Future. In this new briefing paper, lawyer and legal aid expert Sarah Han looks at the historical, legal and political context to the provision of legal aid and describes the efforts of the international community over the past five years to developing funding streams for the accused. The author commends the modest but significant improvements in how Afghanistan’s criminal justice system treats the accused, but critiques the top-down approaches that have led to controversy within the legal aid community and raised important and timely questions for donors, NGOs and ministry officials alike.
Governance
Foreign Policy
17-Apr-12: Washington's war for Afghanistan's women. As Sunday's spectacular attack in Kabul showed, the war in Afghanistan may be winding down in Washington, but it is heating up on the ground with spring's arrival. And in Foggy Bottom and, to a lesser degree, on Capitol Hill, a battle is on for American hearts and minds even as calls for immediate withdrawal grow louder.  The objective: to keep Afghan women from falling off the political agenda while Washington and its NATO allies hunt desperately for a diplomatic solution to America's longest-ever war.  As the NATO summit in Chicago approaches - and women to date still have no formal role - that fight gets more urgent.
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
Foreign Policy
13-Apr-12: Dialing down corruption in Afghanistan. Last week, Afghan president Hamid Karzai surprised U.S. and coalition officials by announcing the creation of a special tribunal and prosecutor to seek redress for the almost two year old Kabul Bank scandal. And earlier this month, the Afghan House of Representatives rejected the proposed federal budget in part because of the allocation of U.S. $80 million to Kabul Bank. Already, the Central Bank has poured $450 million into the beleaguered bank after it lost almost a billion dollars in the 2010 financial scandal. This money has been traced to interest-free loans given to Mahmoud Karzai, brother of President Karzai, to buy shares in the bank itself, and also to former CEO Khalil Frozi, who used bank funds to finance the President's 2009 election campaign.
Governance; Economics
United States Institute of Peace
09-Apr-12 Myths and Misconceptions in the Afghan Transition. The coming period of transition to Afghan control of national security will require greater cooperation and understanding between all parties. Yet with cooperation between the international community, the Afghan government and local communities is currently being undermined by a series of myths and assumptions which stem from the unstable conditions, a perceived lack of shared interests and a handful of highly publicized incidents. The international community often underestimates local capacity for governance in Afghanistan and ignores the success that Afghanistan did have with self-rule for much of the 20th century. Local Afghan communities are skeptical of the aims of both counterinsurgency and statebuilding measures, as projects, such as internationally sponsored elections, have failed to yield anticipated results despite the continued presence of international troops. There is an urgent need to rethink some of the assumptions on both sides of the table which threaten to undermine the long-term prospects for peace in Afghanistan.
Governance; Security
The Asia Foundation
09-Apr-12 Voter Behaviour Survey: Afghanistan's 2010 Parliamentary Elections. As the international community and Afghan citizens reflect on the elections in Afghanistan, and plan for both the 2014 Presidential Elections and the transition of governance for Afghanistan from the international community to Afghan government institutions, the opinions expressed by the people of Afghanistan matter more than ever. In this context, The Asia Foundation successfully conducted its second nationwide survey on elections,  “Voter Behavior Survey: Afghanistan’s 2010 Parliamentary Elections”, from March 14 to March 31 2011, polling 2,397 adult Afghans across the 34 provinces of Afghanistan. This survey follows the Foundation’s first election’s survey, “A Survey of the Afghan Electorate”, published in 2004. 
Governance
Institute for the Study of War
06-Apr-12: ELECTORAL REFORM CRITICAL BEFORE AFGHANISTAN’S NEXT PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION. Afghanistan’s 2009 presidential election and 2010 parliamentary election were plagued by pervasive fraud, which severely damaged the credibility of its electoral organizations and negatively affected the government’s efficacy in the post-election environment. The Afghan government must make substantial improvements to the electoral process to successfully hold its next presidential election in 2014.
The head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA), Special Representative Ján Kubiš, has stated that the United Nations would oversee election day procedures, support the polls, and work to train Afghan electoral staff for the 2014 election. The Afghan constitution prevents the electoral law from being changed within a year of the next election, so the United States, NATO partners, and UNAMA must engage with the Afghan government in 2012 to make critical and meaningful improvements to the electoral process.
Governance
Major Javier Palacios
04-Apr-12 Traditional Dispute Resolution Systems in Afghanistan. Traditional forms of justice within Afghanistan frequently collide with the principles of legality, most particularly with regard to criminal matters, and the monopoly of jus puniendi by the State. But throughout Afghanistan, this system is part of tradition. It is effective, fast and economical, and the Afghan people trust in this system for the resolution of conflicts and disputes. The formal resolution of disputes before the courts following this system is constitutional, legal and respectful of human rights. At the same time, however, it is slow, expensive and difficult for a population that is for the most part illiterate, all of which circumstances also render the system unfair.
Governance
Independent Commission for Aid Impact
30-Mar-12 The Department for International Development: Programme Controls and Assurance in Afghanistan. DFID’s planned expenditure on bilateral aid to Afghanistan is £178 million in 2011-12 and in each of the next three financial years. In Afghanistan, DFID spends its money  in four areas: governance and security, education, wealth creation and humanitarian assistance. The purpose of this review is to assess DFID’s systems of control and assurance over its expenditure in Afghanistan. These systems are important because they help to minimise the risk of theft, fraud and corruption (collectively known as leakage). This report covers DFID’s systems and controls of assessment but not the value for money or effectiveness of the programmes themselves.
Governance; Economics
Afghan Coalition for Transparency and Accountability
30-Mar-12 Afghanistan 1391 National Budget Analysis. This paper is an analysis of the 1391 budget formulation process, produced by the Afghans Coalition for Transparency and Accountability (ACTA). ACTA is a coalition of civil society organizations and associations as well as individuals at the national and community level. ACTA’s mission is to promote transparency and accountability for public policies and resources by reviewing governance-related policies and strategies and using the national budget as one of the main advocacy tools for improving service delivery. This paper aims to provide a summary of the main features of the 1391 budget proposed by the government to the Parliament. It focuses on key initiatives mentioned by the government for further development of an open and inclusive budget formulation process; broad analysis of proposed 1391 sectoral allocations; and also includes a preliminary comparative analysis of the 1390 budget execution and 1391 budget allocation. The paper also highlights the major findings about the 1391 proposed budget along with recommendations for its implementation.
Governance; Economics
Human Rights Watch
28-Mar-12 "I Had To Run Away": The Imprisonment of Women and Girls for "Moral Crimes" in Afghanistan. This report is based on extensive interviews in Afghanistan with 58 women and girls in three women’s prisons and three juvenile rehabilitation centers, as well as with civil society members, prison wardens, prosecutors, government officials, shelter providers, women’s rights activists, government advisors, and legal and women’s rights experts. It focuses on the plight of women and girls charged with the moral crimes of “running away” and zina. The crime of “running away” is nowhere to be found in the Afghan Penal Code.
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
CSIS
26-Mar-12: China and Afghanistan: China's Interests, Stances and Perspectives. China has been actively involved in Afghanistan in the past decade in the form of financial aid and economic cooperation. However, its overwhelming interest in Afghanistan is the stability of its own Muslim-majority Xinjiang province in the western part of the country. Accordingly, China avoids military engagement in the country despite hoping that Afghanistan can be stabilised and not serve as a base of operations for Islamist Chinese groups. That said, the Chinese government is doubtful about the potential for international military efforts to establish security in Afghanistan.
Governance; Security; Economics
Government of Canada
29-Mar-12: Canada’s engagement in Afghanistan - fourteenth and final report to Parliament. In Afghanistan, progress in strengthening security, governance and development is always hard won; the environment for implementing Canada’s new approach in Afghanistan was daunting, and dangerous. The dual nature of our whole-of-government effort—in Kandahar and nationally—made for an especially challenging engagement, one that became the largest Canadian mission abroad since the Korean War more than 50 years ago. At its peak, approximately 2,950 Canadian soldiers and over 120 civilian personnel were deployed to Afghanistan
Governance; Security; Infrastructure
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
27-Mar-12 Gender and Economic Choice: What's Old and What's New for Women in Afghanistan? Results of this rapid qualitative assessment in Kabul and Parwan provinces show that women are faced with considerable barriers that prevent them from accessing economic opportunities. Across all four study areas, women remain constrained by discriminatory attitudes that restrict their mobility, limit employment choices and hinder control over assets. Adherence to traditional gender stereotypes that regard men as income earners and women as dependents still prevails. This restricts women’s mobility and leaves them disadvantaged when it comes to decisions about who will be sent to school and who will join the workforce. Lack of knowledge and education contribute to women being powerless or having no voice in decision-making processes both within and outside the home. In rural areas, women were either unaware of their rights, or unable to exercise them, and decisions about their lives were in the hands of others.
Governance; Economics; Socio-cultural Development
Center for Strategic and International Studies
26-Mar-12: Competition in Afghanistan, Central Asia, and Pakistan. Afghanistan, Pakistan and Central Asia do offer complex challenges for both the US and Iran, with many ethnic divisions, historical tensions, and a shared pattern of economic underdevelopment with the potential for large-scale unrest. The expected withdrawal of US forces in 2014 will have a major impact on regional policies. It is expected that Iran will attempt to expand its influence, while the US deliberates on what extent of material commitment is appropriate for its post-Afghan regional interests.
Governance; Security; Economics
International Crisis Group
26-Mar-12 Talking about Talks: Toward a Political Settlement in Afghanistan. A negotiated political settlement is a desirable outcome to the conflict in Afghanistan, but current talks with the Taliban are unlikely to result in a sustainable peace. There is a risk that negotiations under present conditions could further destabilise the country and region. Afghanistan’s security forces are ill-prepared to handle the power vacuum that will occur following the exit of international troops. As political competition heats up within the country in the run-up to NATO’s withdrawal of combat forces at the end of 2014, the differing priorities and preferences of the parties to the conflict – from the Afghan government to the Taliban leadership to key regional and wider international actors – will further undermine the prospects of peace. To avoid another civil war, a major course correction is needed that results in the appointment of a UN-mandated mediation team and the adoption of a more realistic approach to resolution of the conflict.
Governance
Afghan Ministry of Foreign Affairs
23-Mar-12: Progress Report Since the Fourth Regional Economic Cooperation Conference on Afghanistan. Despite innumerable challenges, including procedural constraints and infrastructural deficiencies, this Progress Report for RECCA V demonstrates several key achievements towards commitments made at the Fourth Regional Economic Cooperation Conference on Afghanistan (RECCA IV – 2-3 November 2010 in Istanbul). In particular, through a series of consultations and a survey conducted with key Afghan Government line ministries in January and February 2012, marked progress was recorded in areas such as trade, transit, investment, border management, infrastructure and vocational training.
Governance; Economics
AIHRC, Open Society Foundations
17-Mar-12 Torture, Transfers, and Denial of Due Process: The Treatment of Conflict-Related Detainees in Afghanistan. In recent months, the Afghan intelligence service has come under increased scrutiny and criticism for its use of torture and other violations of detainees‘ rights.  This report raises significant, new areas of concern, including previously undocumented facilities where torture is taking place and the abuse of detainees transferred by international forces. The report is based on long-term, regular detainee monitoring conducted by the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC), as legally mandated under the Constitution of Afghanistan, as well as on interviews with more than 100 conflict-related detainees between February 2011 and January 2012, conducted with the assistance of the Open Society Foundations.
Governance
Afghanistan Research & Evaluation Unit (AREU)
13-Mar-12:  Does Women's Participation in the National Solidarity Programme Make a Difference in their Lives? A Case Study in Balkh Province. This case study examines women’s participation in the National Solidarity Programme (NSP) in a Pashtun-majority community in Balkh Province. It finds that despite women’s weak involvement in actual project implementation, the NSP offered them an unprecedented chance to take part in activities outside their homes, an opportunity to be involved in community decision-making, and a venue to collectively explore and express their capabilities. While often fragile, these developments were seen as significant positive changes by those involved.
Governance; Economics; Socio-cultural Development
Afghanistan Research & Evaluation Unit (AREU)
13-Mar-12: Equal Rights, Unequal Opportunities: Women's Participation in Afghanistan's Parliamentary and Provincial Council Elections. This report finds finds that there is no one blueprint for a successful female candidacy, and the stories of individuals interviewed for this study were as diverse and complex as the various political environments in which they operated. In almost all cases, successful candidates ultimately secured victory via a combination of good access to financial resources, ties to a powerful family or a political party, and—often most importantly—a strong relationship with a given community or other constituency of voters. Significantly, surprisingly few female candidates chose to court female voters.
Governance; Socio-cultural Development
US Government Accountability Office
23-Feb-12 Afghanistan Security: Department of Defense Effort to Train Afghan Police Relies on Contractor Personnel to Fill Skill and Resource Gaps. In January 2011, Congress required that the GAO report on the use of US government (USG) personnel, rather than contractor personnel, to train the ANP.
Governance; Security
Congressional Research Service
06-Feb-12 Afghanistan: Post-Taliban Governance, Security and US Policy. The US government view is that security gains achieved by the surge could be at risk from weak Afghan governance and insurgent safe haven in Pakistan, and that Afghanistan will still need direct security assistance after 2014. Afghan governance is perceived as particularly weak and
corrupt, despite the holding of regular elections since 2004 and the establishment of several overlapping anti-corruption institutions
Governance; Security
Heinrich Boll Stiftung
06-Feb-12 Women's Perceptions of the Afghan National Police. The security needs of Afghan men and women differ. Whereas men bear the brunt of the direct impacts of conflict, women disproportionately suffer from the indirect effects such as increased levels of domestic violence, decreased access to health care and poverty. Due to this difference in security needs, gender must be taken into account when evaluating the relationship between citizens and the Afghan National Police (ANP). Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung commissioned this study to examine the perceptions active women in Kabul hold of the police. Active, urban women were targeted specifically as they are more likely to interact regularly with police than women that spend a majority of their time at home.
Governance; Security; Socio-cultural Development
UNAMA, UNOHCHR
01-Feb-12 Afghanistan Annual Report 2011: Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict. This report is compiled in pursuance of UNAMA’s mandate under United Nations
Security Council Resolution 1974 (2011) “to monitor the situation of civilians, to coordinate efforts to ensure their protection, to promote accountability, and to assist in the full implementation of the fundamental freedoms and human rights provisions of the Afghan Constitution and international treaties to which Afghanistan is a State party”.
Humanitarian Affairs; Governance; Security; Socio-cultural Development
Brookings Institute
30-Jan-12 Afghanistan Index: Tracking Variables of Reconstruction & Security in Post-9/11 Afghanistan. The Afghanistan Index is a statistical compilation of economic, public opinion and security data. This resource will provide updated and historical information on various data, including crime, infrastructure, casualties, unemployment, Afghan security forces and coalition troop strength. The index is designed to assemble quantitative indicators of the international community’s counterinsurgency and nation-building efforts in Afghanistan, to track them over time, and to offer an objective set of criteria for benchmarking performance.
Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure
ISAF - CJIATF Shafafiyat
17-Jan-12: Corruption & Economic Development in Afghanistan. Corruption, warlordism and bribery inhibit economic development in Afghanistan in a number of ways. Greater support for transparency, monitoring and merit-based decision-making could enable growth in the extractive industries and manufacturing. 
Governance; Economics
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
01-Jan-12 Healing the Legacies of Conflict in Afghanistan: Community Voices on Justice, Peace and Reconciliation. In September 2009, AREU launched a research project to examine the effects of conflict and explore what “justice,” “peace” and “reconciliation” in the wake of wartime violations mean to Afghans in local communities. The research demonstrated that processes of justice, peace and reconciliation were interdependent and overlapping. Ultimately, the success of any one of these processes rested on the fulfilment of the others.
Governance
The World Bank, International Finance Corporation
01-Jan-12 Doing Business - Afghanistan Economy Profile. Doing Business sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 10 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts and resolving insolvency. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2011.
Governance; Economics
Congressional Research Service
12-Dec-11 Afghanistan: Politics, Elections, and Government Performance. This report provides an overview of various aspects of recent Afghan domestic politics. The limited capacity and widespread corruption of Afghan governance are factors in implementing a transition to Afghan security leadership by the end of 2014 and in formulating plans to assist Afghanistan after that time. The capacity of the formal Afghan governing structure has increased significantly since the Taliban regime fell in late 2001, but many positions at the local level are unfilled.
Governance
United Nations Development Program
01-Dec-11 Police Perception Survey -2011. The Police Perception Survey - 2011 is the third in a series of annual public opinion surveys commissioned by the Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA) which is administered by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Afghanistan, to evaluate the perceptions of the Afghan public on the role and performance of the Afghan National Police (ANP).
Governance; Security
World Bank
21-Nov-11: Transition in Afghanistan: Looking Beyond 2014. Full responsibility for security is to be handed over and most international troops are to be withdrawn by the end of 2014—as understood at the 2010 Kabul and Lisbon conferences. Experience suggests that withdrawals of international troops reduce civilian aid, with implications for economic growth, fiscal sustainability, and service delivery. Potential financing gaps in the budget could threaten security and recent development progress, creating a sense of urgency for both the Government and the donor community.
Governance; Security; Economics; Infrastructure; Socio-cultural Development
1 - 100 Next